Previous Entry Share Next Entry
(no subject)
xyu
I remember when we first moved from Russia, my Mom was constantly crying. She was separated from her mother and brother -- who were also afraid to engage in correspondence because it was too dangerous for them. Sometimes my Mom would cry for what seemed like forever. I will never forget, as a nine-year-old, that feeling in my heart when my Mom cried like that.

The Soviet system did that to my mother.
.......


These tortures included laying a man naked on the floor, forcing his legs apart, and then an interrogator stepping on his testicles, applying increasing pressure until the confession surfaced. Keep in mind that many people refused to "confess." Then think about the Soviet secret police raping daughters and sons in front of their fathers and mothers – for the sake of extracting "confessions."

Now visualize me sitting in a graduate studies lounge in Toronto, listening to my colleagues explain to me that communism "isn’t really so bad," that the Soviet Union made some "remarkable achievements," and that Western democratic-capitalism is the most oppressive system of all. At the same time, picture my lecturers having absolutely no respect for a free exchange of ideas on this subject.
----------------------------

Both of my grandfathers were exterminated by Stalinist terror. My father and mother both just barely escaped the Gulag.

But here I am, with Ph.D. students, being treated to a one-hour discussion about "homophobia" on campus. My colleagues are agonizing about how "Homophobia-Free Zone" pink stickers must be put on every door in the university. "But what if a professor or a teaching assistant refuses to have one put on his door?" one of them asks indignantly. After a few seconds of silence, the other answers, "Well, then a committee might just have to be set up where these people will be taken to account." Serious head-nods follow.

..today’s politically correct campus..there are certain individuals -- the most spoiled and self-centred people I have ever met -- who remind me of the scum who fostered the Soviet experiment, who promote the same ideas that gave us the Gulag, Mao’s Cultural Revolution, and Pol Pot’s killing fields.

Working fervently to destroy their own society, they praise other societies -- such as the one that caused my mother’s eternal tears. They are our left-wing intellectuals.

I spit in their faces.




War Stories From Academia

By Jamie Glazov
FrontPageMagazine.com | Thursday, March 22, 2001


POST TRAUMATIC Stress Disorder: I think I still suffer from something of that nature. I didn’t serve in a war; I spent eleven years in academia.

David Horowitz’s recent encounter with the campus Gestapo at Berkeley has given me flashbacks all over again.

Try to imagine being an émigré from the Soviet Union – as I am – and sitting in the company of left-wing "intellectuals" who think they are oppressed. Picture coming from a society where a myriad of your relatives simply disappeared; where this relative or that family friend died under interrogation and torture for his/her beliefs – or for simply nothing at all. Think about Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s account of the tortures that the Stalinist machinery inflicted for the objective of extracting "confessions." These tortures included laying a man naked on the floor, forcing his legs apart, and then an interrogator stepping on his testicles, applying increasing pressure until the confession surfaced. Keep in mind that many people refused to "confess." Then think about the Soviet secret police raping daughters and sons in front of their fathers and mothers – for the sake of extracting "confessions."

Now visualize me sitting in a graduate studies lounge in Toronto, listening to my colleagues explain to me that communism "isn’t really so bad," that the Soviet Union made some "remarkable achievements," and that Western democratic-capitalism is the most oppressive system of all. At the same time, picture my lecturers having absolutely no respect for a free exchange of ideas on this subject.

Both of my grandfathers were exterminated by Stalinist terror. My father and mother both just barely escaped the Gulag. But here I am, with Ph.D. students, being treated to a one-hour discussion about "homophobia" on campus. My colleagues are agonizing about how "Homophobia-Free Zone" pink stickers must be put on every door in the university. "But what if a professor or a teaching assistant refuses to have one put on his door?" one of them asks indignantly. After a few seconds of silence, the other answers, "Well, then a committee might just have to be set up where these people will be taken to account." Serious head-nods follow.

Fascinating. Simply fascinating. The great issues of our time.

I remember when we first moved from Russia, my Mom was constantly crying. She was separated from her mother and brother -- who were also afraid to engage in correspondence because it was too dangerous for them. Sometimes my Mom would cry for what seemed like forever. I will never forget, as a nine-year-old, that feeling in my heart when my Mom cried like that. My consolations seemed to soothe her slightly, but I understood well that they were not the panacea for her grief.

The Soviet system did that to my mother.

Perhaps some of you might understand why I am not amused by the politics on campus. I am not amused by endless discussions of how we are all oppressed because we are being "attacked" by Pepsi commercials. "By trying to tell us that we are not cool if we don’t drink Pepsi," a graduate student told me, "the capitalist machinery practices the politics of exclusion. By trying to pretend it offers us choice, it actually negates choice." And there is no debate permitted on this subject. The anti-capitalist theme is simply just drilled into your mind.

My mom’s father was executed by the Soviet secret police. He did not have the luxury of being oppressed by Pepsi commercials.

One day, when I was nine years old and living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, my father and I were on our way to Church. As we walked near the entrance, I spit on the ground. In a very serious but patient way, my father said to me: "It is ok to spit outside of KGB headquarters, but never in front of a place such as this." I never did it again. I was very wrong that day, because I had ignorantly spit on sacred and holy ground.

But there is another environment that is far from sacred and holy – today’s politically correct campus. And there are certain individuals -- the most spoiled and self-centred people I have ever met -- who remind me of the scum who fostered the Soviet experiment, who promote the same ideas that gave us the Gulag, Mao’s Cultural Revolution, and Pol Pot’s killing fields. Working fervently to destroy their own society, they praise other societies -- such as the one that caused my mother’s eternal tears. They are our left-wing intellectuals. I spit in their faces.

  • 1
Да уж... Беркли- это что-то неописуемое, государство в государстве, театр абсурда, не зря они выпустили столько бойцов всяческих "Бригад", "Погодного андерграунда" и любителей поддерживать освободительную борьбу путем ограбления банков в свое время.

У тебя, по-моему, что-то скопипастилось по второму разу из первого отрывка во второй.

вверху только то что понравилось внизу весь

How old is this guy Jamie Glazov? What city in USSR he came from and when?

I tell you - he was born in 1966 and lived in Moscow. His parents mingled with dissidents. His family left USSR in 1972. I'm sorry, this stuff about testicles is very impressive but unfounded. It was Brezhnev time, methods were different from Stalin's. My parents mingled with the very same people. I know what I'm talking about.
I don't think Jamie had to lie in order to make his point. There was enough impressive evidence, he didn't have to make it up.

А какая разница?
яйца зажимали в 50е или 30е жертвы еще живы

БУковский вспоминает о принудительном кормлении во время голодовки не менее впечатляюще- 60е или 70е

Ага, я тоже смотрела кино, как насильно кормили суфражисток в Америке (the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified in 1920).
Ужас-ужас.

В том-то и дело, что было достаточно реального ужаса и жестокости, и насильное кормление, и угрозы изнасиловать в зоне, и репрессивная психиатрия. Зачем придумывать, если есть не менее впечатляющая правда? Это же дискредитирует и правду тоже.

По-моему, если человек 1966 года рождения пишет о чем-то, как современник, он должен отвечать за базар. Как собственно, и все остальные, но тут это личное.

Почему бы тебе для разнообразия со мной не согласиться?

я согласен.

просто момент про яйца кажется из Архепилага и он вообще метафоричен


а вообще я полнст согласен

у него там есть статя про пянство с буковским так что я понял о чем ты

это называется не удавшаяся патетика

Я знал человека, с которым это делали, в конце 30-х годов. Глазов не утверждает, что это происходил с ним или его родителями - он ссылается на свидетельства Солженицына.

Я не понимаю сути претензий к Глазову.

Про то, что он ссылается на Солженицына - правда, это я с Сержиком зачем-то поовелась спорить, он сказал, что это все равно, когда.

"My father and mother both just barely escaped the Gulag".

"I remember when we first moved from Russia, my Mom was constantly crying. She was separated from her mother and brother -- who were also afraid to engage in correspondence because it was too dangerous for them".

Скажем так. Мои родители общались с теми же людьми, что и его родители. Его родители выбрали уехать, мои - остаться. Сроки угожали тем, кто делал что-то активно. Тем, кто подписывал письма 70е, угрожала потеря работы (не всегда, заметьте, но заранее не угадаешь), про сроки не стала бы утверждать. Это раз.
По поводу писем "оттуда". Моему отцу писали из Израиля уехавшие в 70е родственники. Извините, это не имело никаких последствий. Если его бабушка и дядя боялись переписываться с уехавшими родственниками, это еще не значит, что опасность была реальной. Опять же, для тех, кто работал на "ответственных" должностях, это могло грозить потерей работы или, по карайней мере, неприятностями.

Суть претензий в том, что там, где можно выдать точную информацию, которая производит серьезное впечатление (и в ней нет недостатка, социализм с человеческим лицом не состоялся), человек выдает сместь эмоций с домыслами и сведениями из другой эпохи.

"Моему отцу писали из Израиля уехавшие в 70е родственники. Извините, это не имело никаких последствий"

Для кого-то имело, для кого-то нет. Можно написать - "я сам сто раз переходил дорогу на красный свет, и ни разу не попал под машину" - это не будет доказательством того, что это безопасное действие. Примеров, когда письма из Израиля имели последствия, можно привести достаточно.

Задачу выдачи точной информации - когда, в какие годы сколько человек и за что подвергались репрессиям и каким именно - автор в приведенном отрывке не ставит. Он не утверждает ничего, что было бы ложным, и аккуратно отчитывается о конкретных проблемах конкретной семьи. И о своих и своей матери эмоциях. Что в этом отрывке "домыслы", можно спросить?

автор пишет что его дедов угробили-
ну так это очень даже близко к нему лично

А к этому у меня как раз нет претензций ни на волос.


1. Последствия переписки
Повотряю, это могло иметь последствия, могло не иметь. Последствия заключались бы в неприятностях на работе или увольнении с работы. Мой отец работал врачом на "Скорой", работя тяжелая, сутками, трудно было найти людей... Если человек был начальникам, состоял в партии, был выездным - неприятностей у него могло быть достаточно, ему было что терять. Но говорить об опасности я бы не стала. Опасность - это посадка, а не отмена командировок за границу.

2. Если споришь с левыми, изволь разговаривать на языке фактов, а не "моя мама плакала".

все верно)

знаеш, в москве было легче. в провинции разное было, ну хотя бы и новочеркасск

Я знаю, что в Москеве было легче. К московским диссидентам шли люди из провинции рассказывать про нарушения прав человека там. И инкорров в провинции не было.
Я подчеркнула, что он из Москвы.

  • 1
?

Log in

No account? Create an account